Academics

Our main goal is to establish the US medical educational with our integrated curriculum. Our curriculum prepares students to become compassionate, knowledgeable, highly-competent physicians by providing them with early hands-on clinical training. The student to teacher ratio is 10:1, which provides students with an individualized learning environment.

Curriculum

The curriculum covers all the important knowledge and practical areas that are necessary for students to pursue their licensing examinations and to function adequately as future physicians. Lectures and practical work in every subject area are integrated in the syllabi. Students are required to participate in medical camps, which are organized on a regular basis.  

The MD program consists of two components: Basic Sciences and Clinical Sciences.

Basic Sciences

Students complete the integrated basic sciences at the Washington Medical Science Institute in Saint Lucia. The basic sciences are integrated and there is a strong emphasis on the social and behavioral sciences, learning to deal with ethnically and culturally diverse populations, early clinical exposure and learning about evidence-based practice. During the first five semesters students learn about various organ systems in the body in an integrated manner. Small group active learning strategies are widely employed and the development of self-directed learning and the skill of reflection are encouraged. Students learn about systems-based practice, quality improvement and patient safety. Community health fairs are frequently conducted strengthening links with the local community. Eminent clinicians are regular visiting faculty offering students exposure to the latest knowledge and techniques in medicine. 

Clinical Sciences

For the student to be eligible for the clinical rotations he/she must have successfully completed the Exit Examination conducted by the National Board for Medical Education (NBME) at the end of the 6th Semester of the BMS program. Candidates doing clinical rotations in the United States should have passed USMLE Step 1.